Home

Buch-Shop  

Ausstellungen

Genetik

Archiv

Literatur

 Links

Impressum

 

 

Book-Shop

Shows

Genetics

Archive

Literature

 

  Datenschutz

 

 
Critical Issues in Pigeon Breeding.
ANECDOTAL, ENTERTAINING, AND EDUCATIONAL COMMENTS ON OPEN QUESTIONS
PART II
WHAT WE KNOW AND WHAT WE BELIEVE TO KNOW
Part I to III, 60 pages each
Sell publishing, Achim 2020.

 

New release in the Book-Shop

More than one hundred short contributions created chronologically over the years under 'taubensell', in three parts with 60 pages each. Many contributions refer to classifications of color and breeds. New insights are shown with the hope that readers will recognize the exemplary. Mendel's findings from hereditary experiments with peas will hardly have interested the pea growers. But they became the basis of genetics for the entire animal and plant world. If we understand the inheritance of blue bar x blue barless mating, we follow in Mendel's footsteps and apply the inheritance mechanisms he found in plants. How much closer it is to see for example from the experiments with Rubella and Frosty that and how a recessive hereditary factor like Frosty becomes visible in hens and heterozygous cocks when it is placed in a different genetic context. Something that epistemologically represents a continuation and not a refutation of Mendel. The knowledge could be the starting point for understanding previously not understood phenomena in other factors. Reading the articles with different perspectives on many aspects of pigeon breeding could be useful to strengthen this flexibility of thinking and at the same time help like a serum against the repeatedly burgeoning fakes of the past. In part, contributions were triggered as a response to myths about the origins and past of races that have been rebutted again and again. The revival of such myths is often the result of fantasy, in which reality and dream world are interwoven. Sometimes someone would find an ancient source and not know that old does not automatically mean true. Posted often enough and given 100 likes, it becomes a truth for others that they spread with a clear conscience. Sometimes stories are told over and over again in order to give an advertising legend against better knowledge of one's own race. Even Moore, as the author of what was probably the first monograph on pigeon breeds (1735), was not immune from this.

Breeding committees of some special clubs and organizations should also be more interested in animal breeding questions, in order to understand how their own breed is embedded in the canon of pigeon breeds and to take this into account when setting standards. A lack of monitoring of breed developments and a lack of documentation of the peculiarities of phenotypes as well as rare colors make the claim of the fancy poultry breeding organizations to want to preserve old cultural assets seem strangely empty at the moment. There is a recognition procedure for new breeds that is partly felt to be superfluous and harassing, probably to keep them low in the alleged interest. What happens afterwards with these breeds and also with the old breeds and colors is lost in indefinite responsibilities.